Visit by Indonesian academics (part 2)

bar-beach

Our Indonesian visitors at Bar Beach

The second half of the visit by the Indonesian academics from UIN Raden Fatah Palembang and UIN Sumatera Utara, to look at the integration of research, teaching and community outreach, went well.

legal-centre

The University of Newcastle Legal Centre

On Wednesday we visited the University of Newcastle Legal Centre, an innovative  centrepiece of the Law School’s clinical program, followed by a visit to the beach (where we had fish and chips for lunch) and Blackbutt Reserve. You’ll see it was a tiring day if you look at the before and after photo’s on the bus!

blackbutt

Peacock at Blackbutt Reserve

Before

Before

After

After

On Thursday there were a number of presentations from the Centre of Excellence for Equity in Higher Education (CEEHE), some of the Family Action Centre community programs (Hunter Outreach Program, SNUG and Our Health Rules) and the University’s English Language Centre.

ceehe-presenting

CEEHE presentation

ceehe-photo

The obligatory photo after CEEHE’s presentation

hop

Presentation from the Hunter Outreach Program

language-centre

Squeezing into a tutorial room at the English Language Centre

The day finished with a tour of the main University Library and an opportunity to meet some of Indonesian students study at the University of Newcastle.

library-tour

Start of the Library tour

meeting-indonesian-students

Meeting some Indonesian students

On Friday morning they had the opportunity to do some research in the library and meet some academics and the men went to the local mosque before a BBQ lunch (with the addition of rice) and wrapping up.

bbq-2

Deb cooking the BBQ

bbq

Enjoying the BBQ lunch

gift-giving

Alan Hayes receives a gift from the delegation

We had some interesting discussions. I think some of them were trying to work out what motivates those of us who have no religion, to be caring, generous and attentive to the needs of others. For me it was important to spend time with a group of Muslims and to better understand moderate Islam. While, of course there are differences, we also have many similarities.

We had to be flexible and go with the flow. One time I was rescued by a fire alarm. We’d dropped in to the Uni Coop Bookshop so they could have a look at some Uni souvenirs a bit later than planned. I was very conscious that we were due to meet a senior academic in five minutes, but they clearly needed more time. Just then a fire alarm went off so we had to evacuate the building! We were due in a nearby building so we were able to get to our meeting on time and returned after the meeting to finish their shopping.

dee-presenting

Dee Brooks facilitating discussion

It was also great to work with Dee Brooks again, and to watch her work the crowd!

If you liked this post please follow my blog, and you might like to look at:

  1. (part 1)
  2. Seven principles for a strengths-based approach to working with groups
  3. ABCD and Making the invisible visible
  4. A story of two communities
  5. How painting can transform communities
  6. Teaching community engagement to students from 29 disciplines

About Graeme Stuart

Lecturer (Family Action Centre, Newcastle Uni), blogger (Sustaining Community), environmentalist, Alternatives to Violence Project facilitator, father. Passionate about families, community development, peace & sustainability.
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