Category Archives: Families & parenting

What is evidence-based practice?

Although there is no universally accepted definition of evidence-based practice in social work and family work [1, 2], it is generally described as a decision-making process that incorporates: The best research evidence The best clinical experience Family and client values … Continue reading

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Weaving Parenting Partnerships into Service Delivery

Coparenting has been described as the relationship parents share in the business of raising children, and the quality of this relationship is linked to both child and parent outcomes.1,2 Children from higher quality parenting partnerships experience superior social and emotional … Continue reading

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Cathy, upcycling and raising children

Cathy (my partner) has just been featured in Textile Beat, a website about slow clothing, dressing with conscience and natural fibres. The associated story discusses Cathy’s passion for upcycling as a way of challenging consumerism and over-consumption, our approach to … Continue reading

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Engaging Aboriginal fathers

The following is the final submitted  version of an article (just published in developing practice) by me, Chris May and Craig Hammond, all from the the Family Action Centre at the University of Newcastle.While it is the August 2015 edition, … Continue reading

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Conflict and homeless youth

This is an article I wrote over 20 years ago in Youth Studies.  When writing about my response to the Four Corners program, Australia’s Shame, about the treatment of teenagers in detention in the Northern Territory, I had another look … Continue reading

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Over 60 ideas to consider for strong supported playgroups

How supported playgroup programs deliver their services vary. There are a wide range of practices involved in providing specific program elements, activities, procedures, philosophies, and policies that effect the way each program is provided to families. Attracting parents to the … Continue reading

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An overview of literature on supported playgroups

Family services have been using supported playgroups widely for many years to work with families who may not access community playgroups and other services1. The high cost and complexity of conducting research that clearly demonstrates the effectiveness (or otherwise) of … Continue reading

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Engaging fathers: An overview of evidence-based practice

Fathers are important. Research demonstrates that close involvement of fathers from birth can support positive infant and child development. This includes boosting social, emotional and academic development. Effective co-parenting, where fathers are engaged in positive ways with the mother and … Continue reading

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36 ideas for helping to engage fathers

 The importance of fathers is increasingly recognised in working with families. The following are 36 ideas that could help services engage fathers. Prioritise father inclusive practice in the annual strategic plan Ensure support for father inclusion through policy development Have … Continue reading

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Program fidelity and baking a cake

Program fidelity is an important concept in evidence-based programs. It is the “extent to which an enacted program is consistent with the intended program model” [1, p. 202]. In other words, it’s about ensuring we stay true to the original … Continue reading

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