Tag Archives: Evidence-based practice

What is evidence-informed practice?

Some authors appear to use evidence-based practice and evidence-informed practice interchangeably [e.g., 1] but other authors identify significant difference [2-5]. The main difference is in the approach to evidence. Webber & Carr [4] suggest that, in evidence-informed practice: Evidence is … Continue reading

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What are evidence-based programs?

While evidence-based practice is a decision-making process that incorporates the best research evidence, the best clinical experience and family and client values; evidence-based programs are programs that have been standardised, systematised and rigorously evaluated. According to Williams-Taylor [1], evidence-based practice … Continue reading

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What is evidence-based practice?

Although there is no universally accepted definition of evidence-based practice in social work and family work [1, 2], it is generally described as a decision-making process that incorporates: The best research evidence The best clinical experience Family and client values … Continue reading

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Connecting Communities Conference

I’m looking forward to speaking next month at the Connecting Communities Conference organised by the Local Community Services Association (LCSA). The title of my talk is “Community development in a world of evidence-based practice” and this is what I’ve said … Continue reading

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Program fidelity and baking a cake

Program fidelity is an important concept in evidence-based programs. It is the “extent to which an enacted program is consistent with the intended program model” [1, p. 202]. In other words, it’s about ensuring we stay true to the original … Continue reading

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Research evidence for family (and community) workers

[Updated 2 June 2017] There are a range of reasons we might want to use research evidence as family workers or community workers. A quite inadequate reason, but potentially a motivating one, is that funding bodies are increasingly expecting the … Continue reading

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Finding literature on working with families

The following are some websites which have research publications and other literature about working with families. The list is associated with the post on research evidence for family (and community) workers. Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) including: Publications on … Continue reading

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A literature review on supported playgroups

Do supported playgroups actually make a difference? A recent literature review of research on supported playgroups [1] found that, while they are very popular, there is not a strong research evidence base demonstrating their effectiveness. The lack of research evidence … Continue reading

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What are program logic models?

[Updated 13 July 2017 to add a new resource.] Program logic models are like “road maps” which show how your initiative will work and why you believe that if you do certain things, you will get the results you are … Continue reading

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Mutual self-help parent groups

Mutual self-help groups for parents are widely used as a means of providing support to parents. In 2006 Mary Kay Flaconer from the Ounce of Prevention Fund of Florida wrote a paper looking at the rationale for these types of … Continue reading

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