Tag Archives: Working with communities

Smoking and community engagement

All campuses of the University of Newcastle (UoN), Australia, are now smoke free. I love working in a smoke free environment and don’t miss the days when smoking was much more common. When I was much younger, I had to … Continue reading

Posted in Being an academic, Working with communities | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Recruitment: an important step in engagement

Without successful recruitment, family and community engagement can flounder. Before programs and other initiatives can successfully engage participants, people need to show up or become engaged in some other way. Although advertising and promotion are not engagement in their own … Continue reading

Posted in Facilitation & teaching, Families & parenting, Working with communities | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Graphic depictions of the Spectrum of Public Participation

Tim Bonnemann, the founder of Intellitics and a previous board member of the International Association of Public Participation (IAP2) in the USA, has been collecting graphic depictions of the Spectrum of Public Participation and its variations for a number of years. … Continue reading

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What is the Spectrum of Public Participation?

The Spectrum of Public Participation was developed by the International Association of Public Participation (IAP2) to help clarify the role of the public (or community) in planning and decision-making, and how much influence the community has over planning or decision-making … Continue reading

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My top posts for 2016

There are a number of ways to judge my top posts for 2016. To start with there are 10 posts that I think add a useful contribution to working with communities and families. Some of them came from my work … Continue reading

Posted in Being an academic, Families & parenting, Working with communities | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Photographic reflections on the Fair Share Festival

The Fair Share Festival is over! I’ll post some more detailed reflections later, but here are a few photos and some initial thoughts. After a successful screening of The True Cost (a documentary about fast fashion) on Thursday, we woke … Continue reading

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Mobilising community assets and volunteers can have side effects

One of the strengths of asset-based community-driven development (ABCD) is how it builds on the passions and skills of volunteer community members. It’s amazing what communities can achieve when they rely on their own resources. But there can be a … Continue reading

Posted in Social change, Strengths-based approaches & ABCD, Working with communities | Tagged , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Encouraging a broad understanding of community engagement

A paper about evaluating community engagement as part of the public health system  (South & Phillips, 2014) recognises the potential for community engagement in health to involve more than simply engaging people in planning and decision making. They suggests that … Continue reading

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Rethinking the roles of families and clients in evidence-based practice

The principles which underpinned our approach to supporting Children and Parenting Support programs to implement evidence-based programs and practice as part of the Children and Families Expert Panel, had a large influence on how I presented evidence-based practice in the … Continue reading

Posted in Families & parenting, Strengths-based approaches & ABCD, Working with communities | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

7 principles guiding my work

When I started facilitating workshops on evidence-based programs and practice as part of the Children and Families Expert Panel, I wanted to ensure that my approach was consistent with my commitment to strengths-based approaches and bottom-up community development. In planning … Continue reading

Posted in Being an academic, Facilitation & teaching | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments