A song for Sunday – 99 Red Balloons

I’ve decided to keep the peace songs coming for a little longer. I started working with communities through the peace movement, so I’m enjoying revisiting some songs from my past.

This one, 99 Red Balloons by Nena, always reminds me of a huge nuclear disarmament rally in Melbourne in 1984. Continue reading

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Saturday quote

Photo of hand with quote from Jane Goodall

(Photo of hand by Darcy Moore)

I love the sense of agency in this quote – the sense that what we do makes a difference. At times I feel overwhelmed by the enormity of the social and environmental challenges we face as a community and as a world, but find hope in the many people of goodwill who are out there making a difference.

Jane Goodall really is an inspiring global elder.

If you liked this post please follow my blog (top right-hand corner of the blog), and you might like to look at:

  1. Past Saturday Quotes
  2. The paradox of inconsequence
  3. The joys of a community cinema
  4. The widening gap between rich and poor – Time to even it up
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Some weekend reading

Cat on laptop

(Photo: acebrand)

Every Friday I post some links to articles, videos or other resources that have caught my eye during the week. Some might be quite recent, but others might be older ones I have revisited or recently discovered. They will mainly focus on families, community engagement or environmental sustainability, but not necessarily.

Govt enlists Minecraft for youth consultation from InDaily News – The South Australian State Government is using the video game Minecraft to get help from students in Years 4-7 in designing their national parks.

Spying on your kid’s phone with Teensafe will only undermine trust by Tonya Rooney via The Conversation – “Teenagers have always had secret parts of their lives, and a trusting relationship with a parent is a better antidote to the risks they may encounter than a one-size-fits-all monitoring device that carries with it the potential to undermine that trust.” Continue reading

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Obama (with an anger translator) on climate change

This is an edited extract of a speech by President Obama given to the White House Correspondents’ Association. In it he introduces his “Anger Translator” and then it skips to his comments on climate change.

He makes a powerful statement in an amusing way. Maybe we need more people getting angry about climate change.

For non USA audiences the Anger Translator is comedian Keegan-Michael Key. You probably have heard of Bradley Cooper, the star of American Sniper, (although I confess I had to look him up) and Chuck Todd is an American journalist who hosts Meet the Press.

Both the full speech and the complete Anger Translator section are available online.

If you liked this post please follow my blog (top right-hand corner of the blog), and you might like to look at:

  1. A statistically representative climate change debate
  2. Is our love affair with fossil fuels an abusive relationship?
  3. Blue Men: Message to Humanity
  4. Dear Future Generations: Sorry
  5. The earth is doing just fine – really?
  6. Climate change is real: an open letter from the scientific community
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A song for Sunday – Imagine (by Playing for Change)

This performance of John Lennon’s Imagine by Playing For Change (a “multimedia movement created to inspire, connect, and bring peace to the world through music”) is a wonderful song to end the Anzac Day weekend.

You may say I’m a dreamer
But I’m not the only one
I hope someday you’ll join us
And the world will be as one

If you liked this post please follow my blog (top right-hand corner of the blog), and you might like to watch some previous songs for Sunday:

  1. The Band Played Waltzing Matilda by Eric Bogle
  2. One by Metallica
  3. Nuclear by Mike Oldfield
  4. I was only 19 by Redgum
  5. Foolish Notion by Holly Near
  6. Dust in the Wind by Kansas
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Saturday quote

Photo of war cemetery with quote by Eleanor Roosevelt

(Photo of war cemetery by Mark Freeth)

Today is Anzac Day, the centenary of Gallipoli. World War 1 was supposed to be the war to end all war, but we haven’t learnt the lessons of the past. This quote by Eleanor Roosevelt reminds us that peace does not come easily.

It isn’t enough to talk about peace.
One must believe it.

And it isn’t enough to believe in it.
One must work at it.
Continue reading

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Some weekend reading

German shepherd on computer

(Photo: Will Brenner)

Every Friday I post some links to articles, videos or other resources that have caught my eye during the week. Some might be quite recent, but others might be older ones I have revisited or recently discovered. They will mainly focus on families, community engagement or environmental sustainability, but not necessarily.

Newsflash: Princesses can climb trees from Running Wild – in the end “It’s what we do, not what we wear, that counts.” (Quite a short reflection.) Continue reading

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The earth is doing just fine – really?

Earth doing fine - tweet from Fox News

A World Earth Hour tweet from Fox News. Incredible.

This is an unbelievable tweet from Fox News for World Earth Day. In the accompanying article  it says: Continue reading

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Dear Future Generations: Sorry

For Earth Day, it is a pleasure to share Dear Future Generations: Sorry by Prince Ea, a spoken word artist.

We are currently ignoring the interests of future generations and are unwilling to accept some short-term economic pain in the long-term interests of our descendents. It is as if we are intent on spending our children’s inheritance. Rather than making difficult decisions we are expecting our children to tidy up the mess we have created. Continue reading

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Anzac Day – Lest we forget the wrong things

Lone Pine Cemetery

Lone Pine Cemetery, Gallipoli (Photo: Esther Lee)

I’ll be going to an Anzac day service for the first time this year. It’s not because it’s the 100th anniversary of Gallipoli, nor have I suddenly discovered the true meaning of Australia’s “most sacred day”. It’s simply because Alexa (who’s in year 6) is one of the school captains and has to represent her school. I’d like to say, “No, you can’t go” as I don’t want her to be caught up in the Anzac myth, the way in which Anzac day helps normalise (if not glorify) war, and the political layers of the day, but she takes her role as school captain seriously and I don’t want to force my beliefs on her.

I find stories of Anzac day quite moving, even heartbreaking, but I also find the Anzac myth unconvincing if not unbelievable. According to the official historian of WW1 the Anzacs stood for “valour in a good cause, for enterprise, resourcefulness, fidelity, comradeship, and endurance that will never own defeat” (Bean, 1946, p.181). This Anzac myth continues to be propagated today. Continue reading

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