Some weekend reading

A dog at a laptop

(Photo: Zvi Kon)

Every Friday I post some links to articles, videos or other resources that have caught my eye during the week. Some might be quite recent, but others might be older articles I have revisited or recently discovered. They will mainly focus on families, community engagement or environmental sustainability, but not necessarily.

Families

Alcohol’s harm to others from Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education

Detained children risk life-long physical and mental harm from the Conversation Continue reading

Posted in Working with communities | Leave a comment

Sustaining Community Facebook page

Sustaining Community facebook pageI’ve created a facebook page for Sustaining Community.  As well as having links to my blog posts, I’ll post other interesting bits and pieces. Please like the page and feel free to add comments. Hope to see you there.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | 1 Comment

ABCD and Making the invisible visible

This is a great TEDx talk by DeAmon Harges demonstrating some features of asset-based community-driven development (ABCD). The following are a few of the great quotes that stood out for me.

Find the gifts and talents of everyone in the community. Find a place for that gift, utilise that gift in ways that build community, economy and mutual delight.

ABCD involves more than identifying individual and community strengths and assets. If all we do identify strengths, we are essentially creating a community directory. The power of a strengths-based approach is when we not only identify these strengths and assets, but also mobilise, connect and build on them.

Find the gifts and talents of everyone in the community.

Continue reading

Posted in Families & parenting, Strengths-based approaches & ABCD, Working with communities | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Hurt mining, hurt NSW?

Coal mine with Hurt mining, hurt NSW?

(Mine photo: Stephen Codrington)

NSW Mining has been running a campaign: “Hurt Mining. Hurt NSW.” They argue the campaign is:

Raising awareness of the importance of our miners and the thousands of people working in businesses supplying our mines and to showing [sic] decision makers that if you hurt mining, you hurt NSW.

I wonder if there were campaigns in previous generations along similar lines:

  • Support paper. Hurt the parchment guild.
  • Support cars. Kill the horse and cart industry.
  • Support computers. End the typewriter industry.

Continue reading

Posted in Environmental sustainability | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Some weekend reading

Cat reading online

(Photo: angela n.)

Every Friday I post some links to articles, videos or other resources that have caught my eye during the week. Some might be quite recent, but others might be older articles I have revisited or recently discovered. They will mainly focus on families, community engagement or environmental sustainability, but not necessarily.

Families

Kids from same-sex families fare as well as peers – or better from The Conversation

What a 2-Year-Old Can Teach Us About City Planning from Next City Continue reading

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Domestic violence, family, friends and neighbours

World for domestic violence social network approach

Domestic violence is still largely seen as a private matter between two individuals and few services successfully engage the informal social networks (e.g., family, friends, neighbours and work colleagues) of survivors [1]. Even ‘community’ responses, frequently focus on service providers rather than survivors’ social networks [2]. This is unfortunate as these networks can play a crucial role in preventing domestic violence and in supporting survivors.

Leaving a violent partner is not easy and many women take numerous attempts before ending a violent relationship. They fear repercussions, they face potential poverty, they aren’t sure what will happen to their children, there are a wide range of emotional and practical barriers to leaving, and they don’t know where to go [3, 4]. Violent partners also make it difficult for women to leave by keeping them poor, making them afraid and controlling their movements [3]. Continue reading

Posted in Families & parenting, Working with communities | Tagged , , , , | 12 Comments

Is our love affair with fossil fuels an abusive relationship?

Let's make fossil fuels historyWe can no longer afford our love affair with fossil fuels which is why today (Valentine’s Day) is Global Divestment Day. Despite the prominence given by the media to dissenting voices, the scientific consensus is no doubt that we need to tackle climate change urgently by moving away from fossil fuels.

According to World Resources Institute:

In order to avert the most dangerous impacts of climate change, the international community has agreed that average global temperature rise should be limited to 2 degrees Celsius (3.6° F) . Staying within this boundary requires limiting cumulative global GHG emissions to 1 trillion tonnes of carbon, or 3,667 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide (GtCO2), known as the “carbon budget.” We’ve already used up 52 percent of this budget since the Industrial Revolution, and if emissions continue unabated, the world is on track to exhaust the rest of it within three decades. Continue reading

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Some weekend reading

Woman reading online

(Photo: Alec Couros)

Every Friday I post some links to articles, videos or other resources that have caught my eye during the week. Some might be quite recent, but others might be older articles I have revisited or recently discovered. They will mainly focus on families, community engagement or environmental sustainability, but not necessarily.

Families

Please Don’t Praise Your Kid for Playing With Mine from Ellen Stumbo

The authoritative parenting style: Warmth, rationality, and high standards. A guide for the science-minded from Parenting Science. Continue reading

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Literature on raising environmentally responsible children?

Kids in treeLots of parents want to be environmentally friendly. As I have discovered, having children raises all sorts of dilemmas and parents often struggle with how to be environmentally responsible parents. The interest in the topic was demonstrated when Transition Newcastle held a forum on “Raising Resilient Kids for a Better World” and it was one of our most popular events. Not surprisingly there is a great deal of material on the internet that discusses parenting and the environment. It seems to focus on two main areas:

  1. Green parenting practices (e.g., Little Eco Footprints, Eco Parents Australia)
  2. Connecting children with nature (e.g., Children & Nature Network, Mother Natured)

Continue reading

Posted in Environmental sustainability, Families & parenting | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Give Frank a Break!

A very clever short movie (3:04) with a well-known Australian comedian. It shows the power of using humour to address serious issues and (particular at the end) how much can be said without actually finishing a sentence! If you want to find out more about plastic, I’d recommend the documentary Bag It!

If you liked this post you might want to follow my blog (top right-hand corner of the blog), and you might like to look at:

  1. Making one piece of cling wrap last
  2. The story of bottled water
  3. The paradox of inconsequence
  4. 10 ways to reduce your consumption
  5. Being more environmentally friendly in 2015
  6. Our addiction to growth
Posted in Environmental sustainability | Tagged , | 1 Comment